1989 Lincoln Town Car Signature Series: The Last Call for Opulence

One of the cars I miss the most in today’s lineup of mostly truck-like new vehicles is the Lincoln Town Car. For most of my life, they were there—as personal cars, as limousines, as bad guys’ cars on TV and in movies. I’ve always loved Lincolns. My grandfather Bob drove them for decades before I was born, and as a kid I vividly remember riding in the back seat of his blue ’77 Mark V and looking out the oval opera window on the C-pillar. Someone you might say I was predestined to love them.

Thomas Klockau

And it always seemed a given that large, luxurious Town Car sedans would always be available. I remember about 15 years ago having a discussion with my Uncle Dave about how there were really only three really distinctive new cars at the time: Volkswagen’s New Beetle, the Jeep Wrangler, and the Lincoln Town Car. Most everything else faded into the background.

Thomas Klockau

Today, all that remains is the Wrangler! No more beetles and no more city cars. And the world is just a little bleaker as a result. Indeed, Lincoln has since deleted ALL sedans from its lineup, despite having two great choices in modern luxury in the MKZ and the now-departed Continental. But I’m leaving. Time to get back on track.

Thomas Klockau

The 1989 city car was the end of many traditional suggestions, although the redesigned 1990 model was a fine car in its own right. Indeed, if I didn’t already have my 2004 Town Car Ultimate, I’d love to find a nice 1995–97 Cartier to keep forever, as I’ve driven a lot of lightly used late model cars. But 1989 was the last year for the landau top—or “bus roof,” as Lincoln called it, complete with opera lamps on the B-pillar, the last year for true wire wheels and all. those little chrome accents and details, inside and out. And the bladed front fenders!

Thomas Klockau

Just taking a casual look at these cars, you’ll notice all sorts of Lincoln embellishments: standing hood trim, opera window crests, embroidered seats, accenting headlight bezels. There was also a factory full sunroof option, turbine alloy wheels, lace-spoke alloy wheels and wire wheel cover options. Plus a power moonroof.

Thomas Klockau

And these were big cars for their time, although they have been eclipsed by the earlier Town Cars and Continentals of 1975–79. But today, next to Malibu’s, Camry’s and such, they look big. Overall length was 219.2 inches, with a 117.3-inch wheelbase. It was only available as a sedan, the coupe was gone after the 1981 model year.

Thomas Klockau

The 1989s were much the same as the 85s, with the original new-for-1980 body receiving a slight “aero” facelift, with flatter front and rear bumpers, a new grille, and revised and revised handling. posterior tail slants.

Thomas Klockau

The ’89s can be identified by the new “Lincoln” logos on the lower right side of the grille and trunk lid, replacing the block-style font seen on the ’88s, and indeed, on the Lincoln going back to at least the mid-70s.

Thomas Klockau

A total of 128,533 were built for the year. Three trim levels were offered: Town Car for $25,205 (about $63,079 today); the Signature Series, which added floating cushion-style seating as seen here, among other trims, for $US28,206 ($70,589); and the Top of the Line Cartier Designer Series, available only in Silver Frost Clearcoat Metallic over Pewter Clearcoat Metallic, for $US29,352 ($73,457).

Thomas Klockau

All city cars, regardless of trim or equipment level, had the tried-and-true 302-cubic-inch V-8 under the hood, with a 4.00 x 3.00 bore and stroke and 150 horsepower. Other Lincoln models available in ’89 were the VII luxury coupe, available in Bill Blass and LSC trims, and the V-6, front-wheel-drive Continental.

Thomas Klockau

But the Town Car reigned supreme in sheer size—and popularity, as total production of Mark VIIs and Continentals that year was 29,658 and 57,775, respectively.

Thomas Klockau

There were also many color choices, as in 1989 people bought cars in colors other than black, gray and silver. Featured choices included bright cranberry red, sandstone, rose quartz, pastel adobe, dusk blue, cinnabar and arctic white, as seen on the car featured today.

Thomas Klockau

Speaking of, this car was spotted at the LCOC Mid America meet in Springfield, Illinois last fall. It was a fantastic show and I took way more photos than I should have. I’ve already written about the ’83 Mark VI Pucci Designer Edition that was also at this show, and I’ll almost certainly write about others from this event in the future.

Thomas Klockau

This car was strictly not IN The show, as it was in the general parking lot and not the show field, but it immediately caught my eye with its three-white color scheme (with the fantastic red line and carpet to match the white leather inside) and original, optional wiring in the factory. wheel. It even had a moon roof.

Thomas Klockau

Another reason I’m attached to these cars, and the ’89s in particular, is that I remember my grandmother taking me to South Park Lincoln-Mercury and picking up Town Car and Continental brochures. I still have both brochures today. In fact, I used the same brochure I received in ’89 while writing this article.

Thomas Klockau

My grandparents never got a city car of this generation, but they did have a Rose Quartz Metallic 1987 Continental – the one with the loud styling. And a family friend, Dick McCarthy, had one of these, an ’86 silver-blue metallic with a roof and interior. He drove it for years, until he finally replaced it with a gray ’95 Town Car Executive around 1997. I even drove that car once, at a company event in Springfield.

Thomas Klockau

It was about 20 years ago, and I was helping Jerry Morescki with the ICC booth at the trade show. Somewhere along the line (he was also involved with the company; in fact, he and my grandfather started it) and one night we all went out to Gallagher’s, a supper club not far from the city centre. And the hotel? Crowne Plaza, where the LCOC meeting was held! it Was seen already! In a great way!

Thomas Klockau

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