Chinese food you can make at home for Lunar New Year – and all year round

Chinese food you can make at home for Lunar New Year – and all year round

The relationship between Jeffrey Pang and his son, Kevin Pang, was like a hot and sour soup. It was easy to boil.

The Pangs, who immigrated to the United States in 1988, wanted their son and daughter to experience Chinese culture. But as a sarcastic, video game-playing American teenager, Kevin wasn’t interested. Learn to cook his favorite Hong Kong-style Portuguese chicken or radish cake for Lunar New Year? Forget it.

Why we wrote this

Food can bridge divisions within families. Cooking dishes from their Chinese heritage, a father and son discover a common language and pass on that enthusiasm – with recipes! – for home cooks.

But when Kevin became a food writer for the Chicago Tribune, he realized he had a valuable resource: his troubled father.

“My father and I shared, for the first time, a common interest. I would call to ask about recipes and cooking techniques. He would educate me in the world of Cantonese cuisine,” writes Kevin in the introduction to the cookbook he has just published with his father, “A Very Chinese Cookbook: 100 Recipes From China & Not China (But Still Really Chinese)” by America. Test kitchen.

“When it comes to cooking Chinese food, there’s always been this barrier to entry. It’s a lot easier than people would think,” says Kevin.

Jeffrey says there’s another lesson to be found between the pages of their cookbook.

“I think this cookbook can teach fathers and sons how to bond, how to find a common interest and fix their relationship,” he says.

The relationship between Jeffrey Pang and his son, Kevin Pang, was like a hot and sour soup. It was easy to boil.

The Pangs, who immigrated to the United States in 1988, wanted their son and daughter to experience Chinese culture. But as a sarcastic, video game-playing American teenager, Kevin wasn’t interested. Learn to cook his favorite Hong Kong-style Portuguese chicken or radish cake for Lunar New Year? Forget it. After he left for college, conversations between father and son were brief.

But when Kevin became a food writer for the Chicago Tribune, he realized he had a valuable resource: his troubled father.

Why we wrote this

Food can bridge divisions within families. Cooking dishes from their Chinese heritage, a father and son discover a common language and pass on that enthusiasm – with recipes! – for home cooks.

“My father and I shared, for the first time, a common interest. I would call to ask about recipes and cooking techniques. He would educate me in the world of Cantonese cuisine,” writes Kevin in the introduction to the cookbook he has just published with his father, “A Very Chinese Cookbook: 100 Recipes From China & Not China (But Still Really Chinese)” by America. Test kitchen.

Comparing notes on food slowly began to close the gap between them.

“Cooking is like a bridge. It helps me pass down my mother’s home recipes to the next generation. That’s very, very important to me,” Jeffrey says in a video interview from his home in Seattle.

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