Essentia Health-Fargo welcomes radiologist Dr.  Jeffrey Robison

Like Nowhere Else: The Story of Austin – Essentia Health Video Transcript

(DESCRIPTION)
A hockey player hits a puck. A woman stands outside the ice hockey rink.

(THE WORD)
CHRISTINA BERGLUND: My name is Christina Berglund and I am Austin’s mom.

(DESCRIPTION)
Two hockey players, players 9 and 39, walk across the ice dressed in blue, yellow and white. Christina now sits in the inner bleachers, wearing a hat that says Esko and has a lapel pin with Austin’s picture on it.

(THE WORD)
Austin is nine years old. This is his first year playing hockey. He loves all sports.

(DESCRIPTION)
Player 9 dribbles the ball.

(THE WORD)
And it has been a fun and exciting winter. AUSTIN BERGLUND: Teammate, you need to get back to your net. CHRISTINA BERGLUND: Austin was born without the lower part of his right arm.

(DESCRIPTION)
Austin sits on a bench in his hockey gear and his mom grabs a hockey prosthetic on his arm.

(THE WORD)
When we first started this season, Austin had a body-powered prosthetic with a hockey stick attachment for its bottom. But it was very tight at bat. And because of his age and ability, he wasn’t able to get the stick in and out, or move it or really control it.

(DESCRIPTION)
Player 9 hits the ball while Player 39 sits on the ice.

(THE WORD)
So then we switched to his regular binding and it wasn’t giving him any power or control with the stick. And because of that, he had started tucking his hockey stick under his arm. And we were worried that if he fell or went down, the stick would hit his armpit or cause an injury.

(DESCRIPTION)
Player 9 hits the ball into the net.

(THE WORD)
Some of the hockey dads were talking one night when they were making ice cream at the rink. And one of the dads just said, well, this is what I do for a living. And that’s how we met Joe.

(DESCRIPTION)
Text, Joseph Vanderbosch. Orthotic and Prosthetic Operations Manager. Joseph sits in a medical office.

(THE WORD)
JOSEPH VANDERBOSCH: We noticed that he needed more range of motion in the elbow, right, than he had. So, trying to change the socket design a bit, capturing different areas. So the old plug he had is a self-addict. So he’d go in there and then he’d be held by clamping right over those condyles. But what that does is it significantly limits your range of motion in the elbow and also doesn’t allow you to drop the properties and stretch, right.

(DESCRIPTION)
He twists his wrist left and right.

(THE WORD)
And so we threw a liner on it with a little locking mechanism that has a little pin in the liner so that it locks and suspends that way.

(DESCRIPTION)
Austin swings his new prosthetic and hockey stick back and forth.

(THE WORD)
So we can free up the range of motion in the elbow, so he can have a lot more range in the elbow. And we were able to get it tight enough where we were getting some pronation and supination. So he gets the upper hand, right, when you’re handling the club, you have to use some kind of shoulder rotation, internal and external, and then also pronation, supination. So I think that helped too.

(DESCRIPTION)
In a time-lapse video, they assemble the prosthesis in a workshop.

(THE WORD)
I wanted to take him back for his hockey practice two days later in the evening at Carlton. I think it was the next day, I couldn’t sleep. I woke up around 4:00. I’m like, I’m coming in, I’ve got to start working on this thing. CHRISTINA BERGLUND: I think one of my favorite things about Joe is that he seems to get as excited as we do about making this prosthetic for Austin. Before you knew it, he actually met us at the rink one night with the actual arm and tried it on, put it right there and went out on the ice with it. Just the whole process was extremely fast and exciting, and it definitely had a big impact on Austin’s first season of hockey.

(DESCRIPTION)
Austin dribbles the ball.

(THE WORD)
The first day he was on the ice, it was really cool to watch him swing his prosthetic arm behind his back and lift his stick over his head, doing things he hadn’t been able to do before. AUSTIN BERGLUND: Mom, we’re going to play cops and robbers. CHRISTINA BERGLUND: He’s amazing. I learned very quickly not to think Austin couldn’t do something. You can’t say no to that guy.

(DESCRIPTION)
Austin dribbles the ball and the 39 man approaches.

(THE WORD)
I’m excited to see what the future holds, working with Essentia, and what other amazing tools we can create for Austin for other things in his life to help him fulfill or achieve or pursue any from his dreams that he may have.

(DESCRIPTION)
The two hockey players leave the building and walk down a snowy path marked by tall orange cones. Text, Care like nowhere else SM. Essentia Health. The Essentia Health logo is displayed, consisting of three leaves in a circle.

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