Lewiston shooting victim’s memory honored at Winthrop art gallery

Lewiston shooting victim’s memory honored at Winthrop art gallery

Peter Precourt hangs one of the works for the “There Goes My Hero: Chapter 1 Peyton Brewer-Ross” show Thursday at the Art:Works on Main gallery in Winthrop. Joe Phelan/Kennebec Journal

WINTHROP – Peyton Brewer-Ross will be remembered for many things – his humor, his love for Slim Jim, being a great father and good partner.

Courtesy of Bath Iron WorksCourtesy of Bath Iron Works

Peyton Brewer-Ross Bathroom ironwork

And that’s exactly how his family and friends choose to remember him, not as a victim of the mass shooting in Lewiston.

It’s also one of the goals of Peter Precourt’s latest art installation, “There Goes My Hero,” at his Art:Works on Main gallery at 127 Main Street in Winthrop, where Brewer-Ross’s life is shown through the art he made. in college. , along with art from his family, friends and Precourt.

The gallery opened Saturday morning at 11 a.m., attended by many of Brewer-Ross’ family and friends, where they shared their memories of Brewer-Ross and even added some of their own art to the collection.

“He was full of love and light, had a great sense of humor and was a wonderful father,” said Rachael Sloat, Brewer-Ross finance. “This will help to keep his memory alive.”

Brewer-Ross, 40, of Bath was one of 17 victims of the Oct. 25 mass shooting in Lewiston.

Peter Precourt places a sign in the front window for “There Goes My Hero: Chapter 1 Peyton Brewer-Ross” on display Thursday at the Art:Works on Main gallery in Winthrop. Joe Phelan/Kennebec Journal

His financier, Sloat, had Precourt as an art professor at the University of Maine at Augusta, and Precourt contacted Sloat to see if a gallery was something she wanted to do to commemorate Brewer-Ross.

Precourt wanted to do the gallery as a way to remember Brewer-Ross, but also to continue the discussion about gun violence. He plans to reach out to other families affected by the mass shooting in Lewiston to see if they would like a gallery similar to Brewer-Ross’s.

“It’s a small way to address change by continuing to share stories. Every single number of people taken by gun violence, there’s one person behind it, and then there’s all these people,” Precourt said, pointing to family and friends of Brewer-Ross and Sloat.

On the walls were drawings made by his two-year-old daughter, Elle, a Facebook post honoring Brewer-Ross and paintings he did in college, which included a sipping Blue Ribbon Pasbt, a beer Brewer-Ross was known for. to drink and one with whom he shares his initials.

His longtime friend, Emily Pettengill, created woven art from materials that reminded her of Brewer-Ross. She included a baseball shirt to symbolize where Brewer-Ross and Sloat first met in 2008, along with some pink bows to represent their daughter.

Pettengill also added Slim Jim wrappers, the chili stick candy that was a Brewer-Ross favorite.

Peter Precourt hangs one of the works for the “There Goes My Hero: Chapter 1 Peyton Brewer-Ross” show Thursday at the Art:Works on Main gallery in Winthrop. Joe Phelan/Kennebec Journal

Brewer-Ross was known for wearing an orange and yellow Slim Jim jacket and even wore it to Elle’s birth, Sloat recalled with a laugh. Sloat wore the jacket to his party of a lifetime, and several boxes of Slim Jim were found around the gallery.

“He was a comedian and so animated,” Sloat said. “He always wanted to make people laugh.”

The gallery has a space for visitors to write a memory of Brewer-Ross, where some people have begun leaving notes.

“I hope there’s a pit league in heaven, Peyton,” one person wrote. “I know you will win.”


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